Pecan Bowl

1966

 

North Dakota 42

Parsons College 24

 

North Dakota Fight Song

 

Note: Parsons College of Fairfield, Iowa was founded in 1875 and closed its doors as an institution in 1973. The football team experienced meteoric success in the mid-60’s. The 1966 Pecan Bowl was the high point of Parsons' success. Parsons’ Coach  Marcelino "Chelo" Huerta is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. He previously coached at Tampa and Wichita State and compiled a 23-5 record at Parsons in his three seasons there.  

 

The 1966 North Dakota Sioux were loaded with talent. Errol Mann went on to star in the NFL from 1968-1978. He was a member of the Oakland Raiders' Super Bowl XI winning team. Corey Colehour played for Atlanta Falcons in 1967-68 and went on to play in the CFL at Edmonton from 1968-70. Roger Bonk played for the CFL’s Winnipeg Blue Bombers in 1967 and 1968. Pete Porinsh landed with the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1967 and Jim Hester played for the New Orleans Saints and Chicago Bears from 1967 to 1972.

 

By Mike Davis

The Abilene Reporter-News

 

Cool, collected and confidant, Cory Colehour pecked Parsons College's secondary to pieces like a dilapidated pecan and the University of North Dakota crunched the Wildcats, 42-24, for the NCAA Midwest Region Championship in freezing weather Saturday afternoon at P. E. Shotwell Stadium.

 

Colehour, the big, rangy quarterback of the Sioux who is undecided between a prosperous career in the National Football League and the Canadian League, lofted four touchdown aerials to destroy a proud Parsons College, which was ranked fifth in the nation.

 

This must so down as the most record productive playoff game in the third-year history of the College Division Region championship bowls as 19 marks were shattered.

 

Colehour lays claim to six of the individual records and his deadly right arm takes the credit along with near perfect blocking up front by his comrades. The Pecan Bowl titles have yet to leave the North Central Conference. State College of Iowa, the 1964 champion, and North Dakota State, last year's winner, were joined Saturday by UND.

 

A crowd of 7,500 bunched together in 30-degree weather and watched the Sioux capitalize on a strong wind, Parsons College errors and ideal field position for a 21-7 halftime advantage.

 

Parsons dipped into the lead with a field goal in the third quarter but could never narrow the gap to less than 11 points.

 

The old down-and-out pass pattern drove the Parsons College defensive backs to near hysterics. Colehour sent end Bill Predivich and flanker Jim Hester out on the short yardage plays and they caught nearly half (10) of the Sioux quarterback's record-breaking 22 completions.

 

When the Wildcats backs decided to cover these patterns, Colehour opened up with the long bomb. He twice hit for 43-yard TD's, to fullback Pete Porinsh and Hester.

 

End John Conrad scored the game's first touchdown by sucking up a 13-yard pass from Colehour and Predovich ended the 66-point contest with a 30-yard reception in the final minute.

 

All told, Colehour hit on 22-37 attempts for 274 yards and four markers. Within these feats he had four records. His total offense of 284 yards and rushing and passing plays (40) established another two.

 

The University of North Dakota had a 7-0 lead after the opening quarter, and Parsons was certainly not discouraged because it could have been 17-0.

 

The Sioux moved with its first possession down to the Parsons College 18-yard line. The Wildcats held and forced a 25-yard field goal by Errol Mann. Oddly, a high snap from center proved a blessing for the Sioux. Mann, kicking with bad timing, skitted the ball short and left.

 

Parson's Thomas Derrick decided to field it on the fly. Mann met him the moment the ball touched finger tips and the Sioux placekicker recovered the loose ball on the 13.

 

Colehour connected with Conrad on the short down-and-out pattern on the following play for the touchdown at 6:36. Mann booted the first of six successive PAT's.

 

A puny four-yard punt into the wind by Parsons College punter Thomas Milakovic handed the Sioux a fresh start at the enemy 21. But the Wildcat defensive line stood tall and Mann's 36-yard field goal try was wide to the right.

 

So, now maybe, Parsons College could get rolling. No dice. A high snap on the punting down found Milakovic running for his life. Sioux invaders, led by All- American linebacker Roger Bonk, smothered him at the five.

 

And again the Parsons College defense rose to the occasion. Porinsh hit right tackle on fourth down from the three and got no place.

 

Parsons had the wind in the second quarter, but UND controlled the ball and tacked up two more touchdowns within a five and one-half span.

 

The first TD of the second stanza covered only 14 yards and five plays. It came after a recovered fumble.

 

Porinsh, the young lad who spent some of his early days in a Nazi retention camp, escaped for the final four yards

 

After Parsons' John O'Dell went for a 50-yard field goal that was barely short, the Sioux cranked up again with halfback Jerry Quaderer breaking loose on the draw for 18 and five yards.

 

On a first down play at the Parsons 43, Colehour changed up his tactics. He sent Hester, the bruising 200-pound end, up the middle. Hester caught the quick flip and broke Derrick's grasp at the 25 and rambled the final steps all by his lonesome.

 

Down 21-0, Parsons College finally found a spark in the sputtering offense.

 

Wildcat quarterback Daynor Prince mixed running and short passes and in seven plays it was 21-7.

 

Prince sneaked the last yard and O'Dell's kick was good with only 1:30 left in the first half.

 

When O'Dell hit the mark on his 30-yarder early in the third period, the crowd began to hiss with anticipation of a comeback by the Wildcats. Colehour, that old meanie, ended any such thoughts. He was uncanny with his short passes. He carried the Sioux 72 yards, mostly by air.

 

Porinsh recorded his second TD on a three-yard jaunt. Mann's boot improved the UND lead to 28-10 with 15 seconds showing in the period.

 

The clubs traded out touchdowns in the last 15 minutes. Porinsh handled a pass from Colehour and rambled for his third score to initiate the 28-point fourth quarter showing by the two teams.

 

Prince, who had trouble seeing open receivers because of his 5-10 height and a strong rush by Bonk and friends, connected on two TD shots. He hit Edgar Coleman on a 14 yarder and swift Marcelin on a four-yard play for the other. The second TD came after a successful onside kick.

 

It was 35-24 with better than three minutes to play, and Colehour wanted to add to his 22-touchdown season in the passing department.

 

With the Parsons College defense drawn in tight for the run, Colehour hit Predovich deep down the middle of the field for a 30-yard scoring play.

 

It was an explosive game like everyone predicted. With 19 bowl records, 66 points and an atmosphere full of footballs, what more could you ask for?

 

NDU's Pete Porinsh (24) dives for yardage as Parsons' Ralph Young (80) closes in.

 

Parsons' Edgar Coleman charges downfield.

 

Parsons' Daynor Prince hands off the George Smith.

 

Parsons team huddles with Coach Huerta.

 

Attendance: 7,500

 

Scoring Summary

 

First Quarter

UND- Conrad 13 yard pass from Colehour (Mann kick)

 

Second Quarter

UND- Porinsh 4 run (Mann kick)

UND- Hester 43 yard pass from Colehour (Mann kick)

PAR- Prince 1 run (O’Dell kick)

 

Third Quarter

PAR- FG 30 O’Dell

UND- Porinsh 3 run (Mann kick)

 

UND Porinsh 43 yard pass from Colehour (Mann kick)

PAR- Coleman 14 yard pass from Prince (O’Dell kick)

PAR- Marcellin 4 yard pass from Prince (O’Dell kick)

UND- Predovich 30 yard pass from Colehour (Mann kick)

 

Individual Statistics

 

Rushing

UND- Porinsh 23-90, Quaderer 17-62, Colehour 3-10

PAR- Moore 9-58, Prince 12-23, Smith 6-10, Tuttle 7-13

 

Passing

UND- Colehour 22-37-274

PAR- Prince 17-30-214

 

Receiving

UND- Predovich 7-87, Porinsh 6-44, Bergh 4-41, Hester 3-74, Conrad 2-28

PAR- Coleman 6-42, Marcellin 5-42, Montsinger 3-43, Tuttle 3-33

 

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